File cash transaction reports for your business — on paper or electronically

Does your business receive large amounts of cash or cash equivalents? You may be required to submit forms to the IRS to report these transactions.

Filing requirements

Each person engaged in a trade or business who, in the course of operating, receives more than $10,000 in cash in one transaction, or in two or more related transactions, must file Form 8300. Any transactions conducted in a 24-hour period are considered related transactions. Transactions are also considered related even if they occur over a period of more than 24 hours if the recipient knows, or has reason to know, that each transaction is one of a series of connected transactions.

To complete a Form 8300, you will need personal information about the person making the cash payment, including a Social Security or taxpayer identification number.

You should keep a copy of each Form 8300 for five years from the date you file it, according to the IRS.

Reasons for the reporting

Although many cash transactions are legitimate, the IRS explains that “information reported on (Form 8300) can help stop those who evade taxes, profit from the drug trade, engage in terrorist financing and conduct other criminal activities. The government can often trace money from these illegal activities through the payments reported on Form 8300 and other cash reporting forms.”

What’s considered “cash”

For Form 8300 reporting, cash includes U.S. currency and coins, as well as foreign money. It also includes cash equivalents such as cashier’s checks (sometimes called bank checks), bank drafts, traveler’s checks and money orders.

Money orders and cashier’s checks under $10,000, when used in combination with other forms of cash for a single transaction that exceeds $10,000, are defined as cash for Form 8300 reporting purposes.

Note: Under a separate reporting requirement, banks and other financial institutions report cash purchases of cashier’s checks, treasurer’s checks and/or bank checks, bank drafts, traveler’s checks and money orders with a face value of more than $10,000 by filing currency transaction reports.

E-filing and batch filing

Businesses required to file reports of large cash transactions on Form 8300 should know that in addition to filing on paper, e-filing is an option. The form is due 15 days after a transaction and there’s no charge for the e-file option. Businesses that file electronically get an automatic acknowledgment of receipt when they file.

The IRS also reminds businesses that they can “batch file” their reports, which is especially helpful to those required to file many forms.

Setting up an account

To file Form 8300 electronically, a business must set up an account with FinCEN’s BSA E-Filing System. For more information, interested businesses can also call the BSA E-Filing Help Desk at 866-346-9478 (Monday through Friday from 8 am to 6 pm EST) or email them at BSAEFilingHelp@fincen.gov. Contact us with any questions or for assistance.

© 2020

2019 Tax Filing Deadline Extended

In order to help businesses and individuals cope with the fallout of the COVID-19 crisis, the IRS extended the 2019 federal tax filing deadline from April 15 to July 15, 2020. The extension also applies to 2019 traditional IRA and ROTH IRA contributions. Payment of 2020 first and second quarters’ estimated taxes is also postponed to July 15, 2020.

It’s important to note that some states—but not all—have extended filing deadlines. Check with your state to avoid late penalties.

Need More Time?

Don’t miss the July 15 deadline because any taxes filed on July 16, 2020 or later will be subject to penalties and interest accrual— unless you have filed for an extension to October 15, 2020. To apply for the extension to October 15th, individuals must file IRS Form 4868 while businesses need to file Form 7004 by July 15th.

July 2020 ClientLine Newsletter

Getting Back To Business – having a disaster recovery and business continuity plan at the ready is important.

2019 Tax Filing Deadline Extended – several deadlines were extended from April 15 to July 15.

Emergency Funds – the COVID-19 pandemic provided a heightened awareness for the need to have an emergency fund.

Client Profile – how does a temporary suspension affect income and benefits?

Time To Regroup – as you recover from shell shock, its important to review your financial situation.

Must-Have Documents – a will, powers of attorney and an advance directive are essential elements in an overall strategy to protect the ones you love, providing a measure of certainty when you can’t.

Question and Answer

Short Bits

Tax Deadline Extension

As part of the federal government’s response to the economic impact of the coronavirus, Tax Day has been moved from April 15, 2020 to July 15, 2020 – a three-month extension. Both individuals and businesses have until this new deadline to both file their taxes and make a payment on anything owed. Quarterly estimated tax payments that were set to be due on June 15 have also been pushed back to July 15. Additionally, no penalties or interest will accrue during the extension period.

Also remember that state tax filing deadlines don’t necessarily match up to the federal changes.

Your tax advisor can confirm any changes to the state process and help you determine the best overall course of action for filing. If you’re likely to receive a refund, for example, it’s smart to file sooner rather than later.

Given so many sweeping changes in the tax landscape, working with your tax advisor is more important than ever to make sure you don’t miss out on any potential benefits from the IRS. While you may be accustomed to in-person meetings to go over your tax documents, help is still available via remote meetings.